Circumpolar Arctic Floristic Provinces - North Atlantic Group

 

West Siberia - East Siberia - Beringia - Canada - North Atlantic

Circumpolar Arctic Floristic Provinces - North Atlantic Group

Circumpolar Arctic Floristic Provinces - North Atlantic Group.
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"This group of six regions …partly contains regions recognized as Arctic by Yurtsev (1994), [and] partly new or expanded regions. The Baffin-Labrador region consists of southern Baffin Island, the mainland peninsulas of northern Labrador and Ungava, and the coasts of Hudson Bay (excluding James Bay). The western limitation of this region is still disputed. The West Greenland and East Greenland regions are now extended to the southern tip of Greenland. We exclude two small boreal enclaves in the south-westernmost parts of West Greenland, with forest remnants and with isolated and aberrant occurrences of several species. In the mid-Atlantic is the North Iceland region of the northernmost peninsulas of Iceland, and also including Jan Mayen. The Norwegian island Jan Mayen is included here because it is negatively characterized floristically. Nearly all its species (97-98%) are in common with Iceland. East Greenland and North Norway, and it could equally well have been united with each of these. We have decided not to accept negatively characterized regions and therefore chose to unite Jan Mayen with Iceland because the distance to mainland Norway is much longer. On the European side are recognized two regions. The North Fennoscandian region is 'new' and includes the north-easternmost peninsulas and island of Norway and the northernmost coastal parts of Kola Peninsula in Russia. In the Barents Sea, the Svalbard-Franz Joseph Land region consists of the Spitsbergen Islands, Bear Island and Franz Joseph Land. Franz Joseph Land is negatively characterized; all its species also occur in the Spitsbergen Islands." (From Elvebakk et al. 1999.)